Recipients

Alan James Greer

Allen James Greer

Rank: Second Lieutenant
Organization: U.S. Army
Company: 4th Infantry
Action Place: Near Majada, Laguna Province, Philippine Islands
(July 2, 1901)
Born: August 11, 1878, Memphis, Tennessee
Citation: Charged alone on an insurgent outpost with his pistol, killing one, wounding two, and capturing three insurgents with their rifles and equipment.
Aditional Information: Greer retired with the rank of Colonel in 1940. He graduated from the University of Tennessee with a Bachelor of Arts in 1898. Greer wrote articles for the North American Newspaper Alliance during WWII.
Alvin York

Alvin C. York

Rank: Corporal
Organization: U.S. Army
Company: Company G, 328th Infantry, 82d Division
Action Place: Near Chatel-Chehery, France
(October 8, 1918)
Born: December 13, 1887, Fentress County, Tennessee
Citation: After his platoon had suffered heavy casualties and three other noncommissioned officers had become casualties, Cpl. York assumed command. Fearlessly leading seven men, he charged with great daring a machine-gun nest which was pouring deadly and incessant fire upon his platoon. In his heroic feat the machine-gun nest was taken, together with four officers and 128 men and several guns.
Taylor

Anthony Taylor

Rank: First Lieutenant
Organization: U.S. Army
Company: Company A, 15th Pennsylvania Cavalry
Action Place: Chickamauga, Georgia
(September 20, 1863)
Born: October 11, 1837, Burlington, New Jersey
Citation: Held out to the last with a small force against the advance of superior numbers of the enemy.
mccarthur

Arthur MacArthur, Jr.

Rank: First Lieutenant/Adjutant
Organization: U.S. Army
Company: 24th Wisconsin Infantry
Action Place: Missionary Ridge, Tennessee
(November 25, 1863)
Born: Springfield, Massachusetts
Citation: Seized the colors of his regiment at a critical moment and planted them on the captured works on the crest of Missionary Ridge.
reed

Axel H. Reed

Rank: Sergeant
Organization: U.S. Army
Company: Company K, 2d Minnesota Infantry
Action Place: Chickamauga, Georgia
(November 25, 1863)
Born: March 13, 1835, Hartford, Maine
Citation: While in arrest at Chickamauga, Ga., left his place in the rear and voluntarily went to the line of battle, secured a rifle, and fought gallantly during the 2-day battle; was released from arrest in recognition of his bravery. At Missionary Ridge commanded his company and gallantly led it, being among the first to enter the enemy’s works; was severely wounded, losing an arm, but declined a discharge and remained in active service to the end of the war.
reed

Axel H. Reed

Rank: Sergeant
Organization: U.S. Army
Company: Company K, 2d Minnesota Infantry
Action Place: Chickamauga, Georgia, September 19, 1863; At Missionary Ridge, Tennessee
(November 25, 1863)
Born: March 13, 1835, Hartford, Maine
Citation: While in arrest at Chickamauga, Ga., left his place in the rear and voluntarily went to the line of battle, secured a rifle, and fought gallantly during the 2-day battle; was released from arrest in recognition of his bravery. At Missionary Ridge commanded his company and gallantly led it, being among the first to enter the enemy’s works; was severely wounded, losing an arm, but declined a discharge and remained in active service to the end of the war.
Bolden Reush Harrison

Bolden Reush Harrison

Rank: Seaman
Organization: U.S. Navy
Action Place: U.S.S. Pampang offshore of Basilan, Philippine Islands
(September 24, 1911)
Born: April 26, 1886, Savannah, Tennessee
Citation: While attached to the U.S.S. Pampang, Harrison was one of a shore party moving in to capture Mundang, on the island of Basilan, Philippine Islands, on 24 September 1911. Harrison instantly responded to the calls for help when the advance scout party investigating a group of nipa huts close to the trail was suddenly taken under point-blank fire and rushed by approximately 20 enemy Moros attacking from inside the huts and from other concealed positions. Armed with a double-barreled shotgun, he concentrated his blasting fire on the outlaws, destroying three of the Moros and assisting in the rout of the remainder. By his aggressive charging of the enemy under heavy fire and in the face of great odds, Harrison contributed materially to the success of the engagement.
Aditional Information: In 1981 a Savannah bridge was named after him and fellow Hardin County Medal of Honor recipient Vernon McGarity. It is called Harrison-McGarity Bridge. He is buried in Savannah Cemetery, Tennessee.
Calvin John Ward

Calvin John Ward

Rank: Private
Organization: U.S. Army
Company: Company D, 117th Infantry, 30th Division
Action Place: Near Estrees, France
(October 8, 1918)
Born: October 1898, Greene County, Tennessee
Citation: During an advance, Pvt. Ward’s company was held up by a machinegun, which was enfilading the line. Accompanied by a noncommissioned officer, he advanced against this post and succeeded in reducing the nest by killing 3 and capturing 7 of the enemy and their guns.
Aditional Information: Ward performed his charge with fellow Tennessean Medal of Honor recipient, James “Buck” Karnes. The 30th Division is nicknamed the “Old Hickory Division.” After the war Ward worked in a Bristol mill before attempting to re-enlist in the military. In 2012 a Tennessee House of Representative resolution remembered Ward as the most decorated American soldier in WWI. He was awarded six American honors, including the Medal of Honor and Silver Star, and six foreign medals.
Charles Coolidge

Charles H. Coolidge

Rank: Technical Sergeant
Organization: U.S. Army
Company: Company M, 141st Infantry, 36th Infantry Division
Action Place: East of Belmont sur Buttant, France
(October 24-27, 1944)
Born: August 4, 1921, Signal Mountain, Tennessee
Citation: Leading a section of heavy machine guns supported by one platoon of Company K, he took a position near Hill 623, east of Belmont-sur-Buttant, France, 24 October 1944, with the mission of covering the right flank of the 3d Battalion and supporting its action. TSgt. Coolidge went forward with a sergeant of Company K to reconnoiter positions for coordinating the fires of the light and heavy machine guns. They ran into an enemy force in the woods estimated to be an infantry company. TSgt. Coolidge, attempting to bluff the Germans by a show of assurance and boldness, called upon them to surrender, whereupon the enemy opened fire. With his carbine, TSgt. Coolidge wounded two of them. There being no officer present with the force, TSgt. Coolidge at once assumed command. Many of the men were replacements recently arrived; this was their first experience under fire. TSgt. Coolidge, unmindful of the enemy fire delivered at close range, walked along the position, calming and encouraging his men and directing their fire. The attack was thrown back. Through 24 and 26 October the enemy launched repeated attacks against the position of this combat group but each was repulsed due to TSgt. Coolidge’s able leadership. On 27 October, German infantry, supported by two tanks, made a determined attack on the position. The area was swept by enemy small-arms, machine-gun, and tank fire. TSgt. Coolidge armed himself with a bazooka and advanced within 25 yards of the tanks. His bazooka failed to function and he threw it aside. Securing all the hand grenades he could carry, he crawled forward and inflicted heavy casualties on the advancing enemy. Finally it became apparent that the enemy, in greatly superior force, supported by tanks, would overrun the position. TSgt. Coolidge, displaying great coolness and courage, directed and conducted an orderly withdrawal, being himself the last to leave the position. As a result of TSgt. Coolidge’s heroic and superior leadership, the mission of his combat group was accomplished throughout four days of continuous fighting against numerically superior enemy troops in rain and cold and amid dense woods.
Charles McGaha

Charles McGaha

Rank: Master Sergeant
Organization: U.S. Army
Company: Company G, 35th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division
Action Place: Near Lupao, Luzon, Philippine Islands
(February 7, 1945)
Born: February 26, 1914, Cosby, Tennessee
Citation: He displayed conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity. His platoon and 1 other from Company G were pinned down in a roadside ditch by heavy fire from 5 Japanese tanks supported by 10 machineguns and a platoon of riflemen. When 1 of his men fell wounded 40 yards away, he unhesitatingly crossed the road under a hail of bullets and moved the man 75 yards to safety. Although he had suffered a deep arm wound, he returned to his post. Finding the platoon leader seriously wounded, he assumed command and rallied his men. Once more he braved the enemy fire to go to the aid of a litter party removing another wounded soldier. A shell exploded in their midst, wounding him in the shoulder and killing 2 of the party. He picked up the remaining man, carried him to cover, and then moved out in front deliberately to draw the enemy fire while the American forces, thus protected, withdrew to safety. When the last man had gained the new position, he rejoined his command and there collapsed from loss of blood and exhaustion. M/Sgt. McGaha set an example of courage and leadership in keeping with the highest traditions of the service.
Aditional Information: McGaha was a Pearl Harbor survivor. He also fought in the Guadalcanal Campaign and the Solomon Islands. He was awarded the Medal of Honor, four Purple Hearts, the Asiatic-Pacific Theater Ribbon with four Bronze Battle Stars, the Philippine Liberation Ribbon with star, American Service Ribbon with star, Combat Infantryman Badge, Good Conduct Medal, and Master Paratrooper Wings and Star.